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About Derek Bergen, CFA
Derek Bergen, CFA – Applied Finance Partner  Joined Applied Finance, 2005. Portfolio Manager and Quantitative Research Analyst. B.S. University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Does Inflation Actually Benefit Value Stocks?

March 29, 2021 Derek Bergen, CFA

With massive stimulus and deficit spending, rising inflation concerns have become a concern for investors. It is often assumed that higher levels of inflation bode well for the relative performance of value stocks. We explore the relationship between inflation and value stocks and why this link may not be as strong as investors might think.

Navigating allocation decisions in the face of rising inflation requires more careful stock selection than the current set of passive investment vehicles or factor-based alternatives are equipped to deliver. […more]

Valuation vs. Cheapness in Tactical Allocation

March 10, 2021 Derek Bergen, CFA

Many investors have abandoned their security analysis discipline in the search for low-cost investment products, and most academic research has applauded that decision for decades. Applied Finance has established an extensive out-of-sample systematic track record to confidently defy these trends with a disciplined valuation approach. Because of this, we believe investors benefit from valuation-based investment decisions, not only at the individual stock level, but also by aggregating data across entire investment landscapes. While notable regime shifts between value and growth preferences can be studied with an intrinsic value framework, we encourage investors to consider a comprehensive valuation metric in all of their stock selection, portfolio construction, and asset allocation decisions. […more]

Demystifying the False Choice of Value and Growth Investing

November 19, 2020 Derek Bergen, CFA

Many investors have chosen sides in the partisan “value vs. growth” debate to define their investment ideology and market their products. Instead of choosing sides in this arbitrary debate, since 1995, Applied Finance has advocated for a robust valuation-centric philosophy emphasizing economic principles centered around profitability, growth, competition, and risk. Equipped with this point of view, it is clear that value and growth managers are both aware of important considerations when estimating intrinsic value, but staunch advocates of either perspective suffer from incomplete frameworks. Value advocates are correct that valuation should matter, but commonly used methodologies suffer from poor ex-post performance and lack a robust economic justification, especially when a dividend discount model tautology assumes that negative growth unconditionally generates positive stock market returns. Growth managers are correct that positive growth potentially creates shareholder value, but absent a reliable corporate performance and valuation framework, they too often lack the ability to understand the required future growth and profitability expectations embedded in stock prices. […more]